May 4, 2018

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Iowa, Latest News

ICYMI: Editorial: “Reynolds Has Only Herself to Blame” for Growing Ethics Scandals

The Quad-City Times published a damning editorial about how Kim Reynolds’ mounting “ethical failures” are hurting her credibility and political viability as governor. Reynolds has been taking heat for her secretive handling of a sexual harassment scandal involving a close political ally. She compounded her problems this week by appointing her father to a state board without disclosing the conflict of interest. The editorial said Reynolds now “finds herself politically exposed” for her “brash nepotism” and “shear arrogance.”

Read excerpts from the scathing editorial below or the entire piece HERE:

Quad-City Times: Editorial: Reynolds has only herself to blame

Gov. Kim Reynolds spent the past two weeks dousing her credibility with gas. And, on Tuesday, she lit a match and torched it. 

Last week’s self-inflicted burn was the Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) sexual harassment scandal, where the Reynolds administration assumed  “take our word for it” could pinch hit for compliance with state transparency laws. Then, on Tuesday, Iowa’s freshman Republican governor appointed her father to a state panel tasked with selecting judges.And her administration didn’t even disclose the conflict of interest until, yet again, a pesky journalist started asking questions. 

Ah yes, brash nepotism was clearly the best way to re-establish trust and an air of authority. As if the questionable patronage wasn’t bad enough, the intentional failure to disclose only exacerbates questions about this administration’s commitment to being forthright. 

The own-goaling of the past two weeks were completely unnecessary. It was nothing short of shear arrogance that Reynolds opted to name her father — without disclosure — to a state board, especially as the dumpster fire at Iowa Finance Authority still smoldered.

But over the past two weeks, the perception that Reynolds runs a steady, drama-free shop has evaporated. And the unnecessary, self-inflicted wounds might accomplish what questions concerning tax cuts, privatized Medicaid and under-funded schools have so far failed to do. 

For the first time, Reynolds finds herself politically exposed. And she has no one to blame but herself.