October 1, 2014

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Latest News, Wisconsin

Scott Walker is the problem. Not the solution.

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker comes in for some rough treatment in the latest national profile about his national ambitions. On the ropes and in the political fight of his life in his race for reelection against businesswoman Mary Burke, GQ magazine reveals the lengths to which Scott Walker isn’t the solution, but the problem.

Stuck at the very bottom in Midwest job growth, Wisconsin, under Walker, has faced a growing budget shortfall already pegged at nearly $2 billion while the middle class has been left behind in favor of the wealthiest and special interests.

“Called the most ‘conservative Governor in America,’ a ‘national symbol of Darwinian partisanship’ and someone who ‘rarely does interviews’ by GQ, Wisconsin voters have been reminded that Scott Walker embodies the failed economic philosophy and culture of corruption that has come to define Republican governors across the country,” said Danny Kanner, DGA Communications Director.  “Walker has pursued a right-wing economic agenda that puts tax breaks for the wealthiest and businesses that ship jobs overseas ahead of middle-class families and investments in education. Because of it, he’s broken his promise to create 250,000 new jobs, and his state ranks dead last among Midwest states for job growth. That’s not a record voters are looking for in a governor, no less a President, and the people of Wisconsin will prove that in November.”

BACKGROUND:

Scott Walker Ranked As One Of The Nation’s Most Conservative Governors. In April 2013, Nate Silver ranked the nation’s Republican governors on their “conservatism measures,” taking into consideration their voting records (if applicable), donors, and public issue statements. Walker ranked third, behind only Butch Otter of Idaho and Mike Pence of Indiana. [FiveThirtyEight, New York Times, 4/16/13]

Washington Post Headline: “Scott Walker And The Most Polarized State In The Country.” “Exit polling from Wisconsin’s Republican presidential primary on Tuesday night makes one thing very clear: The Badger State has the most polarized electorate in the country. The source of that polarization? Republican Gov. Scott Walker… What the Wisconsin exit poll proves is that there is NO grey area when it comes to Walker. His move to strip public-sector unions of their collective bargaining rights drew a line in the political sand in the state — and almost no one straddles that line. There are virtually no persuadable voters.” [Washington Post, 4/4/12]

PolitiFact: “Promise Broken” On Walker’s Pledge To Create 250,000 New Jobs. “Shortly after he won the 2010 election for governor, PolitiFact Wisconsin told Republican Scott Walker that we planned to monitor progress on his top campaign promise — that the state would add 250,000 private-sector jobs by the end of his four-year term. Bring it on, Walker said, adding that his official web site would be keeping its own tally… Our tally now stands at 102,195 jobs — or about 40 percent of what Walker promised… In May 2014, as it became evident that there has not been a massive surge in private sector hiring, we moved the 250,000 jobs promise from In the Works to Stalled. In the three months since that change, the number of private sector jobs has fallen by 900. We’re moving this rating to Promise Broken.” [PolitiFact Wisconsin,9/18/14]

PolitiFact: “True” That Wisconsin Is “Dead Last In Midwest Job Growth.” “Mary Burke contends that ‘Wisconsin’s dead last in Midwest job growth.’ […] she uses the most accurate jobs data for the longest Walker-era period that can be analyzed with it. And Wisconsin does bring up the rear… We rate the claim True.” [PolitiFact Wisconsin, 8/31/14]

Journal Sentinel Headline: “Top Wage Earners Get Biggest Benefit From Gov. Scott Walker’s Tax Cuts.” “The top 20% of Wisconsin wage earners — those making more than $88,000 a year and paying the most in taxes now — would receive 44% of the benefit of Gov. Scott Walker’s latest proposed tax cuts, a new analysis shows. The bottom 20% of state residents by income — those making below $21,000 a year and paying the least in taxes now — would receive 5% of the $504.6 million Walker wants to cut in property and income taxes, according to the review by the liberal Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy and the Wisconsin Budget Project.” [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 1/24/14]

 

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