August 14, 2017

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Georgia, Latest News

In Primary, GA Republicans Threaten Business Environment Again

Candidates Reignite Debate Over “Religious Liberty” Law That Threatened 2019 Super Bowl
All Four Race to the Right of Gov. Deal

The race to the right is on in Georgia.

Georgia’s Republican candidates for governor are reigniting a debate that nearly cost Atlanta the 2019 Super Bowl.  Four Republican candidates for governor have all outflanked their own GOP governor’s position on the state’s controversial religious liberty bill:

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and his three Republican rivals signed a pledge that they would enact a “religious liberty” measure if they’re elected governor, taking a united stance on one of the most contentious debates in Georgia.

Secretary of State Brian Kemp and state Sens. Hunter Hill and Michael Williams had already signaled their support for the pledge. But Cagle’s decision to sign it was a surprise given his changing stances on the measure.

In the spring of 2016, Gov. Nathan Deal vetoed similar legislation after business leaders threatened to halt future business in the state. Most notably, the NFL warned it would not bring the 2019 Super Bowl to Atlanta if the bill became law. Movie studios also said they would pull production from the state if the legislation was passed.

Then, earlier this year, Deal came out strongly against the bill when it was revived in the state legislature, citing the economic harm that would surely follow.

“Our state is doing exceptionally well and we’ve seen rather disastrous consequences from other states who have made a departure on that issue,” said Gov. Deal.

Unfortunately for Georgia, the four Republicans running to replace him don’t seem concerned with those “disastrous consequences” at all.

“Lt. Gov Casey Cagle, Sec. of State Brian Kemp, and state Senators Hunter Hill and Michael Williams are running as far right as they can,” said DGA Communications Director Jared Leopold.“All four have committed to wreak havoc on Georgia’s economy. Georgia deserves a governor who will put the state’s economy first. No matter who emerges out of the race-to-the-right primary, the Republican nominee for governor will be far to the right of Governor Deal.”

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