April 11, 2016

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Latest News, Ohio

ICYMI: Kasich Throws McCrory Under the Bus

ICYMI: Kasich Throws McCrory Under the Bus

Even McCrory’s Fellow GOP Governors Are Abandoning Him over HB2 

This weekend, Ohio Gov. John Kasich spoke out against Gov. Pat McCrory’s anti-LGBT law in North Carolina, joining a chorus of Democratic and Republican governors who have criticized McCrory on the issue. 

During an interview on CBS’s Face the Nation, Kasich said: “I wouldn’t have signed that law from everything I know.” Watch the clip on CBS’s Face the Nation here.

Kasich joins a growing list of Republican governors who have rebuked discrimination laws similar to McCrory’s, including Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker, South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard, and North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple.

McCrory signed House Bill 2 last month, which allows businesses to discriminate against the LGBT community, and precludes cities in North Carolina from passing non-discrimination orders. McCrory’s law has brought severe economic fallout to North Carolina, including the loss of 400 PayPal jobsgrowing losses in the travel and tourism industry, and has caused numerous other companies to reconsider major economic development projects in the state.

Read a full story from CNN below: 

John Kasich: I wouldn’t sign North Carolina’s House Bill 2

CNN wire 

4/10/2016

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio Gov. John Kasich said Sunday that he would “probably not” have signed a controversial North Carolina law that blocks transgender individuals from using public bathrooms that match their gender identity and stops cities from passing anti-discrimination ordinances to protect gay and transgender people.

 The GOP presidential candidate also said people who disagree on the issue should just “get over it.”

The law prompted outrage from LGBT and civil rights groups who say its discriminatory. Conservative leaders insist that their goal is simply to protect religious individuals’ from violating their faith-based convictions.

“I believe that religious institutions ought to be protected and be able to be in a position of where they can live out their deeply held religious purposes. But when you get beyond that, it gets to be a tricky issue. And tricky is not the right word, but it can become a contentious issue,” Kasich said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

Governors of Mississippi and North Carolina have recently signed bills into law that gay rights groups and some corporations have decried as discriminatory.

Supporters of the bills say they are designed to protect the religious and individual freedoms of the states’ citizens.

Kasich said no such legislation has emerged in Ohio, but added that he “obviously” would not want to “force people to violate their religious convictions.”

“In our state, we’re not facing this,” Kasich said. “So everybody needs to take a deep breath, respect one another and the minute we start trying to write laws, things become more polarized, they become more complicated.”

Kasich said people who have disagreements should just “get over it.”

“Why do we have to write a law every time we turn around in this country? Can’t we figure out just how to get along a little bit better and respect one another? I mean that’s where I think we ought to be. Everybody chill out. Get over it if you have a disagreement with somebody,” he said. “Unless there’s something that pops up, I’m not inclined to sign anything.”

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