March 19, 2019

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Latest News, Maine

Dem Govs Get Results: Janet Mills Preserves ACA Protections in Maine

Protects Mainers With Pre-existing Conditions, Ensures Essential Health Benefits Covered, Prevents Age Discrimination

 Today, Maine Governor Janet Mills signed a new law that codifies the Affordable Care Act’s health care protections into state law. The measure ensures that Mainers will still enjoy the consumer protections instituted by the ACA, regardless of what happens to the legislation at the federal level. As Republicans in Washington D.C. continue to threaten the future of the ACA, Governor Mills has ensured that Maine residents with pre-existing conditions will not be denied coverage.

Here is a roundup of the local coverage:

Maine Public Radio: Mills Signs LD1, Preserving Key Protections Of The ACA In Maine

Gov. Janet Mills Tuesday signed LD1, a measure that codifies into state law consumer protections under the federal Affordable Care Act.

Supporters say the goal is to protect Mainers from future efforts to dismantle the ACA.

The new law requires that insurance plans cover essential health benefits, such as prescription drugs, emergency services, maternity care, mental health care and substance use treatment. It would allow children to stay on their parents’ insurance plans till age 26. The statute also prohibits insurers from charging substantially higher rates to seniors because of their age, and bars denying coverage to people with pre-existing conditions.

Associated Press: Maine enshrines Obamacare protections

Maine has enshrined former President Obama’s health coverage protections into state law. Democratic Gov. Janet Mills signed the emergency bill into law Tuesday.

Maine’s law requires insurance companies to follow patient protections outlined in Obama’s health law, which a federal district court judge ruled against in December. Maine’s law, for example, allows young adults up to age 26 to remain on parents’ insurance.

Maine law already has some patient protections, such as a ban on limiting or denying coverage because of an individual’s pre-existing conditions.

But Mills’ administration said the law’s needed in case the ruling’s upheld. 

For example, if courts strike down Obamacare, previous Maine law would have allowed insurers to charge seniors five times what younger patients pay. Maine’s new law maintains Obamacare’s 3:1 ratio.